…Tugging at My Sleeve!

Boysenberry Fruit

Today started with a delivery of ‘Live Plants’ – to be precise my Boysenberry plant.

‘Large, tasty berries!’ (Yum, looking forward to a few homemade Boysenberry pies this Autumn).

Boysenberry

The Boysenberry was developed during the Great Depression by Rudolf Boysen, a Swedish immigrant and horticulturist who lived in the Napa Valley region of California. His first plant to bear fruit was in 1923.

‘A cross between loganberries, raspberries and dewberries, boysenberries are incredibly hardy and even more resistant to disease and drought than blackberries. They’re vigorous-growing and will produce a heavy crop of fruit which boast all the flavour of a wild blackberry, but are several times the size!’ (Sutton Seeds)

Plot 5A was tugging at my sleeve after a weekend without a visit.  I had quite a few jobs that really needed to be done asap. Planting was the first job on my list.  Plant the Blackcurrant bush, Lemon Balm, Shallots, Garlic and Blueberry (late season) – I should a crop of blueberries throughout the summer!  Protecting the Cocktail Kiwi with a pop up ‘greenhouse’ was the second. Followed by securing a willow obelisk ready for the Sweet Peas (The wind on Plot 5A can be vicious so it needed quite a few stakes to stop it from being blown over!) The final job was to tie up some gorgeous plastic bunting I found in the local garden centre.  A mere ‘frill’, I know but it does look pretty!

Plot 5A is beginning to look like an allotment!
 Plot 5A is beginning to look like an allotment!

(The blue netting you can see in the background belongs to the neighbouring allotment keeper.  It houses a number of bee hives.  I shouldn’t have any problems with pollination this year!) 

28 thoughts on “…Tugging at My Sleeve!”

  1. Ooh will you tell me where you got your Boysenberry bush from? That was on my original wish list. Loving the bunting and jealous of the neighbouring bee hives. Plot 5A looks amazing… well done on all the hard work!

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    1. Sutton Seeds…it was suggested by James Wong for ‘taste’. Thank you…It was mighty windy on the plot today so I’m not sure I’ll have bunting tomorrow! Haha. Yes, I’m hoping the bees will be a real positive. I’m told they swarmed a couple of times last year but the owner is one off the top bee keepers in the area so he sorted quickly. A few houses near tried to have them removed but thankfully our council had a little sense! Weather is hindering progress at the moment on the plot at the moment though 😦 Longing for some warm sunshine 🙂

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  2. Very wet and windy here tonight in our part of West Yorkshire, we’re high up but no mountainsides around here. I’d never heard of Boysenberry until a couple of years ago when we started using Easiyo yogurt as that’s one of our favourite flavours. My friend has bees and she is often seen in summer getting a swarm off a nearby car or climbing up a tree and usually just in shorts and tshirt, she must be mad! Mr C and the grown up child have time off next week so fingers crossed for warm sunshine as there’ll be a lot of muck and top soil to wheelbarrow up the hill and then dig in as well as a shed to build! My job is shopping, planting seeds and tending to seedlings!! 😉 Fingers crossed your bunting is still where it should be when the sun comes out again! 🙂

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    1. In shorts and t-shirt?! That IS mad! Haha…not looking good for this week on the weather forecast but I’m an optimist so ever hopeful 🙂 Good luck with the wheelbarrowing and shed building 🙂

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      1. She’s a tough Yorkshire Lass who charms the bees! You’ve got to keep optimistic where the weather’s concerned. At least the shed will mean no more car full of tools every time we go to 5B and some shelter! By heck it’s windy here today… hold onto your bunting! 🙂

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    1. Jostaberry?! Sounds intriguing. I’ll have to browse the internet for more information!! Yes I’ll most definitely write a blog or two on produce ‘taste’…fingers crossed for fruit this year 😊

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      1. I have some jostaberries but I don’t rate them that much. You can’t really eat them raw (quite sharp) and you’d get the same taste if you stewed gooseberries and blackberries. I got them free though and they are easy to grow so they stay for now! Not sure if you have them already but tayberries are fantastic! They are a cross between blackberries and raspberries but the taste is quite unique and cooked they are AMAZING! They don’t travel well so you can’t buy them either 😛

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      2. I bought a Tayberry for the house fruit garden last year. It was rather small to tell the truth, so it didn’t fruit 😕 But my fingers are crossed for this year (especially now you’ve recommended them for their taste). Jostaberries…yes I googled them last night. They seem to be quick growers and can take up lots of room. Conflicting views on how well they fruit – ranges from nothing to bucketfuls. Taste would be my concern – once again a love / hate situation. Pity google doesn’t have ‘taste’ along with image, shopping etc (I’d add smell too!) Haha

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      3. I just have the jostas ‘fencing’ my orchard area… I usually forget about them to be honest! The tayberries can take about 2-3 years to establish. You may get a small crop this year but in a year or two you’ll be fighting huge new suckers!! You have to treat them like summer raspberries… Once they start fruiting remove the fruited canes each year – they only fruit on new wood.

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      4. Thanks for the advice. My Tayberry is growing over an archway. I didn’t prune last year but it has reached around the halfway point on the arch… I guess I need to wait and see. If it doesn’t fruit this year then I can chop for a crop the following year ☺

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    1. Haha…not on my group of allotments. They all think I’m crazy! Allotments shouldn’t have frills apparently!!!! Lol Just been up to check for destruction and devastation after the gale force winds last night…the bunting held on!!! Whoohoo

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  3. Whoo hoo I ordered two Boysenberry bushes last night, thank you for reminding me that they were what I really wanted on our plot too 🙂 My mum had bought us two blackcurrant canes for 5B that took my original blackberry or boysenberry space away but no, I have decided to stick to my original plan and Bosenberries it will be… we already have three blackcurrant canes at home so mum will now be the proud owner of two canes at her house too! 🙂

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  4. More fruit for jam making is what I’m thinking… and jam goes very well with cake my other love in life! The plan is now written in concrete and and Mr C keeps saying there’s not enough space… never realised that filling 82m2 would be so easy! 😉

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    1. Jam…perfect! I know haha I need more space for all my plans! I’ve starting eyeing up a unkempt plot next to 5A but can’t steal until September even if ‘they’ continue to fail to maintain it! Current owners have popped in twice in 6mths! Grrrrr… Lol

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  5. It is addictive isn’t it! That’s what we’d said but 4B and 6B either side of us are both even worse than ours was! The owners of 5A at the back of us took over 4A last autumn so there’s nowhere for us to grow really. Mr C would tell me off for wanting to run before I can walk but the thought of a greenhouse… 😉 So many unloved patches on our site but it goes downhill and gets wetter… plot 1 is full of marsh grass, plot 2 is empty and plot 3A and 3B both look like they’re half unloved… really annoying when it’s taken me 3 years on the waiting list but the council need to do some serious work to get rid of the drainage problems before 1 and 2 are usable! Been a world of all four seasons here today with wheelie bins making our estate look more like a go kart track! Eeek!

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    1. Wow, what a combination! Very interesting to hear about whole sites too! I think another blog is forming…need to dig out my camera and take some ‘big’ shots me thinks. Thanks for sparking an idea 😀

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